Drillbotics


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Drillbotics
® 2019-2020 COVID-19 Cancelation

We regret to advise you that the 2020 Drillbotics Competition has been canceled.  With the current situation with COVID-19, multiple universities have shut down or severely restricted student access to labs and/or team meetings.  As a result, a lot of teams haven’t been able to make progress towards the final demonstration.  Originally, the committee wanted to hold an event to recognize your hard work allowing you to present via teleconference your findings during Phase II of the contest.  However, with all the upheaval from school closures and the move to online classes we do not want to add to your stress.  The 2020 competition is simply canceled and the contest will resume this fall for the 2020-2021 Drillbotics challenge.  We expect the 2021 Drillbotics Competition guidelines to be very similar to the 2020 guidelines with a few changes based on team feedback.  More on this will be announced in the summer.  We appreciate everyone’s participation this year and special recognition goes to all the students.  You put in a lot of work and proposed some very creative designs that we were looking forward to seeing in action.



Updates to Drillbotics® 2019-2020
For the 2019-2020 competition (canceled), a second category was added.  Group A was to build a rig to drill a directional well. Group B was to create a digital model of the rig, the well, and a directional drilling technique.  Phase I finalists included 18 teams in Group A (mini-rig) and 4 teams in Group B (virtual rig).  Final tests were to be held in June in Houston and Celle.  For details and further information on these two Groups please proceed to this link: https://drillbotics.com/guidelines/




Drillbotics® Competition Results 
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Drillbotics® 2019 Competition Results


Of the eleven teams who entered the competition this year, only three were able to drill directionally. Several schools had problems with Customs delays; most had to overcome equipment problems.   All had problems with their downhole sensors.  Yet two teams managed to drill a directional well beyond the edges of the rock.  Congratulations to the 2018-2019 winners: 

OU_Picture.jpg FIRST PLACE            University of Oklahoma

SECOND PLACE        University of Stavanger

THIRD PLACE           University of Calgary 


OU will present their paper at the 2020 IADC/SPE International Drilling Conference and Exhibition in Galveston, Texas on Wednesday 4 March.  They will present at 13:45 in Session 13 Drilling Automation II in the Grand Ballroom C.  They will also exhibit their rig on the exhibition floor in booth 201.


Teams who participated in previous Drillbotics competitions have several advantages over any new entrants.  They may have several years of experience, and they may be able to use all or part of the rig built earlier.  For this reason, the Drillbotics committee created a separate category for first-time competitors.  Those teams competed against the previous year’s guidelines to help level the playing field.  For 2018-2019, new teams participated in the program by drilling a vertical well.


FIRST PLACE                       École Nationale Polytechnique (ENP)

SECOND PLACE                   Université Kasdi Merbah Ouargla (UKMO)

F
or the 2019-2020 competition, a second category was added.  Group A will build a rig to drill a directional well. Group B will create a digital model of the rig, the well, and a directional drilling technique.  Phase I finalists include 18 teams in Group A (mini-rig) and 4 teams in Group B (virtual rig).  Final tests will be held in June in Houston and Celle.  For details please check out this link: https://drillbotics.com/dates-for-drillbotics-regional-tests/ 

World Oil published an interesting article in their December 2019 issue. “Sizing up rig automation” by Mike Slaton.  Mike captures the human factors of the competition as well as its technical challenge.  He interviewed students, professors, committee members.  Take a look.
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Drillbotics® 2018 Competition Results 

The Drillbotics Committee is pleased to announce the winning teams for the 2017-2018 competition. There were nine teams this year, including four teams with their first working rigs. All entries were robust, functional rigs, although a few teams had difficulties with their control systems. None of the teams were able to use data from their downhole sensor in the control algorithm. The average drilling time was about 15 minutes, but one team drilled the rock sample in less than 4 minutes. Some of the more innovative designs this year included:

1.  Design and construction of a non-aggressive PDC bit 
2.  Improved pipe couplings
3.  Hammer assisted drilling, via a downhole hammer or a surface-generated hydraulic hammer
4.  Novel BHA designs and 3D printed sensor subs
5.  Several new telemetry techniques from the downhole sensor
6.  Optimization algorithms
7.  Dual control loops not affected by the loss of a single sensor
8.  Auto-generated drilling reports

The judges considered the students’ knowledge of drilling dysfunctions and the mitigation techniques they successfully implemented to overcome problems. Other factors included creativity, teamwork, safety and project management. No single factor was dominant in the decision; the overall learnings and innovations led to our choice:

1st   Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU)
2nd  University of Oklahoma
3rd   Texas A&M University


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The NTNU team members and what they are doing since graduating: (from left) Alexander Handeland, software developer at Sopra Steria; Per Øystein Turøy, field engineer at Altus Intervention; Sebastian Knoop, field engineer at Altus Intervention; Mikkel Leite Arnø, working on a PhD in drilling automation at NTNU; and Andreas Thuve, completion engineer at Equinor.  Source DSATS/Fred Florence

 


 

Drillbotics® 2017 Competition Results

Thank you for the hard work and long hours by the student teams participating in the 2017 Drillbotics competition.  Through two semesters you have learned things that are not in the textbooks.  You experienced the thrill of invention followed by the intense effort necessary to develop your innovation into a working prototype.  All of you experienced times when things did not go as planned, yet you found ways to keep moving forward.  Congratulations to all of you.  However, since this is a competition, we judges have to grade your overall performance as best we can.  The winning team was closely followed by three other entrants, so close in fact, that we felt there was a tie for third place.  The winners of the 2017 competition is as follows:

  1st        Texas A&M University

 2nd        Norwegian University of Science and Technology's (NTNU) 

3rd Tie    University of Stavanger (UiS)

3rd Tie    University of Oklahoma

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The winning team at Texas A&M includes Tyrell Cunningham, Enrique Zarate Losoya, Ibrahim El-Sayed and their professor Dr. Samuel Noynaert (not shown).


 

 

Drillbotics® 2016 Competition Results

The Drillbotics tests for 2016 have now been completed.  Every year the competition gets stronger and the judges find it harder to select a winner. This year, the winning team was West Virginia University.  They drilled the 10.5 inch rock sample in a record time of 27 minutes and the wellbore was fully vertical.   They included interactive drill-off tests to select optimal drilling parameters in near real-time.  The team includes Tawfik Elshehabi, Zachary Cox, Gbolahan “Bugzy” Idowu, Cody Smith, and Rachael Richard.  Dr. Ilkin Bilgesu, Faculty Advisor, will be hard pressed to replace them next year.

Full details of this competition can be found here...

 


Drillbotics® 2015 Competition Results

The Drillbotics tests for 2015 have now been completed.  The winning team from the University of Oklahoma researched and learned about drilling automation, applied those concepts in real-time experiments, built a miniature drilling rig, and discovered, first-hand, the power of teamwork.  All of the student teams need to be congratulated on their achievements and the hard work that got them there.  We also want to acknowledge the support of the university leaders who guided and supported their teams.  Thanks to our sponsors who provided the funding to make this possible.  Thanks to those at NOV and Baker who manufactured bits, drillpipe and rock.  And don’t forget the committee members who have helped so much in organizing the competition, reviewing and editing guidelines, letters, reports and papers plus the time to supervise the tests at the various universities.  Last but not least, thanks to SPE and IADC for their articles publicizing the competition. This has been a tremendous team effort.

Drillbotics 2015 Champions Oklahoma University   The winning team from Oklahoma University Drillbotics 2015






Papers related to the DSATS Automated Drilling Rig (Drillbotics) Competition. Started in 2014-2015, this competition is open to multi-disciplinary teams of students from universities around the world.


2018-2019 University of Oklahoma
IADC/SPE International Drilling Conference and Exhibition, 3-5 March, Galveston, Texas, USA
Directional Drilling Automation Using a Lab-Scale Drilling Rig: SPE University Competition
https://www.onepetro.org/conference-paper/SPE-199640-MS

Akita, E., Dyer, F., Drummond, S., Elkins, M., Duggan, P., Ahmed, R., & Florence, F. (2020, February 25). Directional Drilling Automation Using a Lab-Scale Drilling Rig: SPE University Competition. Society of Petroleum Engineers. doi:10.2118/199640-MS

 

2017-2018 Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU)
SPE/IADC International Drilling Conference and Exhibition, 5-7 March, The Hague, The Netherlands
Design and Implementation of a Miniature Autonomous Drilling Rig for Drillbotics 2018
https://www.onepetro.org/conference-paper/SPE-194226-MS

Arnø, M., Thuve, A., Knoop, S., Hovda, S., Pavlov, A., & Florence, F. (2019, March 4). Design and Implementation of a Miniature Autonomous Drilling Rig for Drillbotics 2018. Society of Petroleum Engineers. doi:10.2118/194226-MS


2016-2017 Texas A&M University
From the IADC/SPE Drilling Conference, 6 - 8 March 2018 in Ft. Worth, TX.
Lab-Scale Drilling Rig Autonomously Mitigates Downhole Dysfunctions and Geohazards Through Bit Design, Control System and Machine Learning

https://www.onepetro.org/conference-paper/SPE-189630-M
Noynaert, S., Cunningham, T., El-Sayed, I., Zarate Losoya, E., Florence, F.  Lab-Scale Drilling Rig Autonomously Mitigates Downhole Dysfunctions and Geohazards Through Bit Design, Control System and Machine Learning.  SPE-189630-MS

 

2015-2016 West Virginia University
From the 2017 SPE Western Regional Meeting - Bakersfield, California 23-27 April
A Real-Time Interactive Drill-Off Test Utilizing Artificial Intelligence Algorithm for DSATS Drilling Automation University Competition 
https://www.onepetro.org/conference-paper/SPE-185730-MS
H. Bilgesu(West Virginia University),Z. D. Cox(West Virginia University)T. A. Elshehabi(West Virginia University),C. Smith(West Virginia University),  G. O. Idowu(West Virginia University),F. R. Florence(Rig Operations LLC)

 

2014-2015 University of Oklahoma
From the 2016 SPE Annual Technical Conference and Exhibition, 28-30 September, Houston, Texas, USA
Design, Construction and Operation of an Automated Drilling Rig for the DSATS University Competition
https://www.onepetro.org/conference-paper/SPE-174920-MS
Bavadiya, V. A., Aljubran, M. J., Kibe, J. M., Christy, S. M., Le, H. N., Ahmed, R., & Florence, F. (2015, September 28). Design, Construction and Operation of an Automated Drilling Rig for the DSATS University Competition. Society of Petroleum Engineers. doi:10.2118/174920-MS

 

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